ChurchRodent

Origen

One of the early leaders of the "Catechetical School" in Alexandria, he succeeded Clement at age eighteen. Origen set before his students the goal of genuine philosophy, the attainment of the good life. Ignorance, he said, is a great barrier to godliness. He developed the "allegorical interpretation" of Scripture. He…

Adam Schall

The Successor to Matthew Ricci, Jesuit Missionary to Peking, China. He carried Ricci’s scholarly work to an even higher level. He won the admiration of the Chinese scholar class by accurately predicting the time of an eclipse of the moon and became Director of the Imperial Astronomical Service. In 1650…

John Wesley

(1703-1791) 15th child of Rev. Samuel Wesley, Epworth Lincolnshire. Went to study at Oxford at 17, studied at Christ Church and Lincoln College. His brother, alarmed at the spread of Deism on campus he assembled a small band of Christians determined to take their religion seriously. Under John’s leadership they…

Act of Toleration

(1689) While the Independents and the Dissenting Brethren of Westminster were effective in developing and spreading a new tolerant attitude toward other faith-groups with their new denominational theory, this view of the church found only limited acceptance in England, where the Church of England still retained a favored position, even…

William Carey

The first Protestants to attempt to reach distant peoples with the gospel were the Pietists. Moravian concern, however, was focused on individuals in some European colony, perishing without the knowledge of Christ. The Christian groups created by Pietists were tiny islands in the surrounding sea of "heathenism." William Carey introduced…

Eusebius of Caesarea

(AD 265-330) Early Christian historian. The biographer of Constantine who represented the emperor as the ideal Christian ruler and envisioned the beginning of a new age of salvation. He also put forward a creed at the Council of Nicea. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, Constantine, Creed, Eusebius-of-Caesarea, history[/tags]  

Maxentius

When Emperor Diocletian divided the empire into two parts (East and West), Maxentius eventually became the senior Western Emperor when he murdered Constantius and usurped his position. Maxentius was the son of Constantius’s predecessor. He was later defeated by Constantine at the battle of the Milvian Bridge in the autumn…

Pope Paul VI

When Pope John XXIII died in the midst of preparations for an additional session during Vatican II, Cardinal Montini, Archbishop of Milan, succeeded to the Papacy. He immediately announced his intention to continue the Council. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, history, John-XXIII, Pope-Paul-VI[/tags]  

Michael Servetus

In 1553 this brilliant but erratic Spanish physician sought refuge in Geneva where Calvin’s enemies were challenging his authority. While Calvin wanted a more merciful death than burning for the heretic, he did support the silencing of the ill-balanced thinker. Servetus was burned at the stake. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, history,…

Anabaptists

(See also "Schleitheim Confession") A movement beginning on 21 January 1525 in the house of Felix Manz by men who believed that the Christian Church of the New Testament was not dictated by the secular government, i.e. separation of Church and State. Called Anabaptists by their opponents because they "re-baptized"…

Eugene Carson Blake

Dismayed at the hundreds of divisions within Protestantism, in 1960, as chief executive officer of the United Presbyterian Church in USA, and later General Secretary of the World Council of Churches, he proposed that the Protestant Episcopal Church and Northern Presbyterians jointly invite the Methodists and the United Church of…

Charismatic Renewal

While the application of this term may actually be more broad than indicated here, our text uses it to refer to the Catholic Charismatic Renewal, or the Catholic Pentecostalism. Leaders traced its beginnings to the spring of 1966 when two laymen on the faculty of Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, realized…

Dominicans

Founded by Spaniard Dominic Guzman (1170-1221), and given official approval in 1220, the preaching order was called "mendicant" meaning "begging" and the term "friar" (or brother) distinguished them from monks because, unlike monks, they went forth to live among people to preach and teach. Just as monastic housed had once…

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