ChurchRodent

Pachomius

The monastic movement took a significant step forward when, around the year 320, a former soldier named Pachomius instituted the first Christian monastery. Instead of permitting the monks to live singly or in groups of hermits, each a law to himself, Pachomius established a regulated common life, in which the…

Revival

An instrument the evangelicals used to subdue the frontier wilderness was the revival. The Second Great Awakening provided the next generation with skilled and dedicated leaders for the western crusade. The great western frontier revival took place in newly settled regions between the Alleghenies and the Mississippi and centered in…

Nathan Soderblom

(1866-1931) Lutheran Archbishop of Uppsala in Sweden. Was the founder and chief promoter of the Life and Work Movement. When the King of Sweden unexpectedly appointed him archbishop in 1914, conservatives within the church questioned his orthodoxy. Soderblom rejected faith in the divine and human nature of Christ because he…

Thirty Years War

(1618-1648) A war waged in the early 17th century that involved France, Spain, Sweden, Denmark, Austria, and numerous states of Germany. The causes of the war were rooted in national rivalries and in conflict between Roman Catholics and Protestants. For all the bloodshed, there was no decisive winner or loser;…

Vatican Council I

(1870) This council represented the culmination of a movement called "ultramontanism," standing for devotion to Rome (across the mountains, the Alps. Go figure.). The council opened in Rome on 8 December 1869. The question of the definition of papal infallibility the item on the agenda. The Catholics had little doubt…

Westminster Assembly

(1642-1649) Held in 1642 through 1649 at Westminster, London, England, the majority voice at the Assembly held to Presbyterian principles and expressed these convictions classically in the Westminster Confession of Faith and in the Westminster Larger and Shorter Catechisms. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, history, Westminster-Assembly, Westminster-Confession-of-Faith[/tags]  

Baptists

In 1608, John Smyth baptized himself in Amsterdam. He had been a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge, but as a Separatist fled from the harsh rule of James I’s England. After his death one of his associates, Thomas Helwys, led back to England a group that had split from Smyth’s…

Church Councils

Church organization developed in two important ways: the authority of church councils and the authority of certain bishops over other bishops. Councils arose when churches in various areas began sending their pastors (or bishops) to meetings to discuss common problems. As the fourth century began, the catholic churches were establishing…

Congregationalists

The real architects of the denominational theory of the church were the seventeenth century Independents (Congregationalists) who represented the minority voice at the Westminster Assembly (1642-49). The majority at the Assembly held to Presbyterian principles and expressed these convictions classically in the Westminster Confession of Faith and in The Westminster…

Miles Coverdale

A Cambridge graduate and reformer, a contemporary of Tyndale. During Tyndale’s months of imprisonment Coverdale published the first edition of Tyndale’s complete translation of the Bible. He is given credit for having translated the first complete English Bible in 1535. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, English-Bible, history, Miles-Coverdale, Reformation, Tyndale[/tags]  

Charles Dickens

Novelist, quoted as describing King Henry VIII as "a most intolerable ruffian and a blot of blood and grease on the history of England", and was also quoted describing a typical English factory town in the early nineteenth century from his novel Hard Times. [tags]BlogRodent, Charles-Dickens, church-history, ChurchRodent, Henry-VIII, history[/tags]…

Ecumenism

Ecumenical means world-wide or universal. Applied to Christian churches, it implies the oneness of Christians in the faith, wherever they may be found. This unity can be either a spiritual reality apart from organizations of men or an effort to create some federations of churches or some merger of denominations.…

John Foxe

Collected the vivid reports of the martyrdoms under Queen Mary in his Book of Martyrs (1571) and incited the English people to a longstanding horror of Catholicism. He succeeded in giving Mary the name by which history still remembers her, "Bloody Mary." [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, history, John-Foxe, martyr[/tags]  

Geneva Bible

A Bible translation which was the work of several English exiles in Geneva during the reign of the Catholic, Queen Mary. Miles Coverdale, who had translated the first complete Bible into English in 1535, was in this group. Once printed during the early years of Elizabeth’s reign, the Geneva Bible’s…

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