ChurchRodent

Baptists

In 1608, John Smyth baptized himself in Amsterdam. He had been a fellow of Christ’s College, Cambridge, but as a Separatist fled from the harsh rule of James I’s England. After his death one of his associates, Thomas Helwys, led back to England a group that had split from Smyth’s…

Congregationalists

The real architects of the denominational theory of the church were the seventeenth century Independents (Congregationalists) who represented the minority voice at the Westminster Assembly (1642-49). The majority at the Assembly held to Presbyterian principles and expressed these convictions classically in the Westminster Confession of Faith and in The Westminster…

Charles Dickens

Novelist, quoted as describing King Henry VIII as "a most intolerable ruffian and a blot of blood and grease on the history of England", and was also quoted describing a typical English factory town in the early nineteenth century from his novel Hard Times. [tags]BlogRodent, Charles-Dickens, church-history, ChurchRodent, Henry-VIII, history[/tags]…

Geneva Bible

A Bible translation which was the work of several English exiles in Geneva during the reign of the Catholic, Queen Mary. Miles Coverdale, who had translated the first complete Bible into English in 1535, was in this group. Once printed during the early years of Elizabeth’s reign, the Geneva Bible’s…

James McGready

From Scotch-Irish stock in Pennsylvania. A preacher, he stressed the wrath of the Lord against stiff-necked sinners. In North Carolina he ignited a revival that drove scores of penitents to conversion. Yet he found that the frontier congregations did not always wilt under torrid preaching. In 1798 he abruptly moved…

Pachomius

The monastic movement took a significant step forward when, around the year 320, a former soldier named Pachomius instituted the first Christian monastery. Instead of permitting the monks to live singly or in groups of hermits, each a law to himself, Pachomius established a regulated common life, in which the…

Thirty Years War

(1618-1648) A war waged in the early 17th century that involved France, Spain, Sweden, Denmark, Austria, and numerous states of Germany. The causes of the war were rooted in national rivalries and in conflict between Roman Catholics and Protestants. For all the bloodshed, there was no decisive winner or loser;…

Westminster Assembly

(1642-1649) Held in 1642 through 1649 at Westminster, London, England, the majority voice at the Assembly held to Presbyterian principles and expressed these convictions classically in the Westminster Confession of Faith and in the Westminster Larger and Shorter Catechisms. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history, ChurchRodent, history, Westminster-Assembly, Westminster-Confession-of-Faith[/tags]  

Anti-Semitism

The obvious example of overt anti-Semitism may be found in the Nazi regime. Nazi theoreticians developed a barbaric doctrine of anti-Semitism. To regain the lost innocence of the past, Germany, they argued, had to purge the present of its impurities. The Jews served as scapegoats. They were the source of…

Charles I

(1603-1642) King of England. Charles was determined to put into practice his father James’ theories about divine rights of kings. No law and no parliament would restrain him and to make matters worse in the eyes of the Puritans, his wife, Henrietta Maria, was a French Roman Catholic princess. Charles…

Donatism

Donatist charges centered on the fact that certain Catholic bishops had handed over the Scriptures to be burned during the persecution under Diocletian. Such an act, the Donatists insisted, was a serious sin of apostasy. Since the Catholic pastors were ordained by bishops who had sinned so grievously, the Donatists…

Feudalism

Feudalism was a type of government in which political power was exercised locally by private individuals rather than by the agents of a centralized state. One text states: "Fully developed feudalism was fusion of three basic elements: (1) the personal element, called lordship or vassalage, by which one nobleman, the…

Gregory of Nyssa

One of the Cappadocian fathers, he taught that in Christ the Logos had united in himself the divine and human natures. Both natures existed by themselves and distinct from one another, yet they were not separated, but arranged in such a way that their attributes were mutually exchangeable. [tags]BlogRodent, church-history,…

Louis XVI

King of France. In 1789 he convened the Estates-General, a national assembly representing the three traditional divisions — or Estates: the clergy, the nobility, and the common people. Controversy sprang up immediately over how the assembly should conduct its business. It had not met for 175 years, and its powers had…

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